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© Copyright 2015. Melbourne Spa Repairs Email: info@melbournesparepairs.com.au

Spa Maintenance & Disinfection

Spa Maintenance

Spas need to be cared for and looked after like any other piece of machinery. At values between $4000 and $60,000 a spa shouldn’t be left alone to wait until something goes wrong. We recommend your spa be thouroughly inspected 6-monthly, with water checked monthly or weekly by someone truly qualified to understand YOUR spa’s chemical needs, as each spa is different and is operated differently. Cheat Sheets Available for Download: Lithium-based Spa Instructions | Bromine-based Spa Instructions | Peroxide-based Spa Instructions NEVER USE POOL CHLORINE (Dichloroisocyanuric Acid or Trichloroisocyanuric Acid). Damage *Will* Occur. Chemicals / Healthy water Due to the smaller body of water and less “splash out” compared to a normal swimming pool, spas are more likely to have an increased Total Dissolved Solid (TDS) present.  It’s therefore recommended to change spa water every three to four months, or replace about one-third of the volume every three to four weeks. Or at least bucket-swapped regularly. As the water is generally warm, the treatment guidelines for spa pool water in comparison to a pool are very different. Test the water before each use, or weekly when you’re not using the spa, and always wait one hour before using the spa after adding chemicals to the water. Regularly check total alkalinity, pH and sanitiser (PHMB, Chlorine or Bromine levels). The range of total alkalinity is recommended between 80ppm to 150ppm for effective sanitation. We only recommend Chlorine/Bromine-free alternative sanitizers if you or your family has sensitive skin or other skin conditions. There are many downfalls to chlorine-free alternatives. Testing pH The pH level measures acidity or alkalinity and is measured on a sale of 1 to 14, with 7.0 being neutral. Below 7.0 is acidic, and above is alkaline. Incorrect pH levels can cause poor Sanitiser efficiency, eye and skin irritations, corrosion of metal & plastic fittings, cloudy water and the formation of scale on the spa walls and fittings. Bromine is one of the worst for its affect on pH and is generally the cause of corroded jets and damaged heater elements. The recommended range for pH is 7.2 to 7.8. It can be increased by adding Alkalinity Increaser/Buffer, and reduced by adding pH reducer.  Always test again after one hour and for an accurate reading, at least once a month take a sample to your local Swimart store. Sanitising To ensure safe, healthy water which is free of harmful micro-organisms, sanitising your spa is essential.  The amount of sanitiser required depends on water temperature, how many people use the spa and how often.   In very hot water, the sanitiser can be used up very quickly, and should be checked regularly while the spa is being used. The most common forms of sanitiser for spas are Lithium, Chlorine and Bromine, Hydrogen Peroxide (Poppits). Ozone systems are commonly installed on spas and, depending on how they’re installed, provide an effective sanitation and oxidation effect.   However, because ozone leaves no residual, Australian Standards dictate other forms of sanitiser must be used in conjunction with it although generally at reduced amounts. Unfortunately Australian Standards do not apply to domestic pools & spas, so just about every “pool guy” or pool shop/chemical dealer will tell you different information. With our background in Commercial Pools & Spas, we always recommend you stick to Australian Standards. Ultra-Violet Radiation (UV) systems should be used in conjunction with Ozone and not on their own. They provide another step in sterilizations and also aid in the breakdown of combined chlorine (the smelly stuff at public pools). Both Ozone & UV systems should still be combined with another standard chemical sanitizer, but can drastically reduce the amounts of chemical sanitizers needed. Salt Water / Bromine Salt Water generators produce bromine or chlorine at consistent, small levels, so as to avoid the “shock” of adding alot of Chlorine/Bromine at a time. If you are using a salt water chlorinator, ensure it is designed and sized to produce the correct level of chlorine required to sanitise a spa. Silver/Copper Ionizers - these are another alternative sanitation system that can be very effective but again, we always recommend an additional standard chemical sanitizer in conjunction. Chemical dosage As discussed above, the amount of disinfectant required depends on water temperature and on how many people use the spa and how often. Keep in mind that very hot water (above 35 degrees) consumes the sanitiser very quickly, so make sure you check the level regularly when the spa is in use. After heavy use of the spa, the water should be shock dosed with Spa Shock/OxyShock/Peroxymonosulfate. Make sure you check the sanitiser level again before use. Even if you’re not using the spa or hot tub, we recommend maintaining an appropriate sanitiser and pH level to prevent contamination. People with Tinea, Chickenpox, or Gastro should avoid pools & spas until treated or healthy. Spas & Pools that have had exposure to bird feces should be treated appropriately before use. Normal Chlorine levels will not kill cryptosporidium. Pool Water Chemistry & Proper Sanitation can be very complex. Unlike typical Pool Shops & Pool “Technicians” we have a thorough knowledge of what is required for swimming pools & spas, and abide by Victorian Government Regulations. As A Guide, Current Health Regulations for Disinfection State: See Regulations for more information. Your equipment manufacturer may have differing requirements. Important Tips & Notes: Keep the temperature below 40 degrees (a range of 35 – 38 degrees is ideal) It’s important to keep the filter clean - clean the filter regularly and at least quarterly, soak your filter in Filter Degreaser. Store chemicals in a cool dry place out of the reach of children and animals Never mix chemicals together and never add water to chemicals, only add chemicals to water If your spa comes with a safety cover, ensure this is closed and locked when the spa is not in use Do not put your head under water in a spa. Spa suctions are a main cause of entrapment risk for hair and limbs Do not allow children in a spa without constant adult supervision Regularly check all suctions outlets are operating and suction covers are intact Understand the regulations and don’t necessarily trust a “pool guy,” Pool Shop, or “Pool Expert” to know what’s best for your particular system. As we said, there are no Regulations for domestic pool & spa chemical levels & filtration. Following what your pool guy said, is not necessarily the best way to go. We strongly discourage the use of Bromine due to its effect on pH & damage to equipment. We will not warrant any of our work where a spa uses Bromine, or where the pH has been shown to be low long-term. Have your spa checked 6-monthly by a licensed person, not a “pool guy.” Some Sources: http://www.health.vic.gov.au/water/aquatic-facilities/faqs.htm http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/enterprisemelbourne/industries/tourism/documents/pool_handbook.pdf http://www.health.vic.gov.au/water/aquatic-facilities/index.htm http://www.legislation.vic.gov.au/ http://www.royallifesaving.com.au/aquatic-centres/managers/guidelines-for-safe-aquatic-venues/guidelines-for-safe-pool- operation http://www.gspo.com.au/
“Don’t let pool Cowboys near your spa! Call the experts & Get it right the first time”
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We accept:
The Gas Heater & Electronic specialists more Manufacturer’s recommend. We are on the lookout for a well- presented, qualified service person for other areas of Melbourne. Please email us if you are interested.
Our trading terms are located on our website and the trading terms shall form part of the contract which governs the relationship between you and us”.
Gecko, Balboa, Aquaflo, SpaNET, SpaQuip, Hurlcon, Astralpool, Pentair, and more…
For swimming pool servicing we recommend www.pooltechs.com.au
© Copyright 2014. 360px | Melbourne & Peninsula Spa Repairs Email: info@melbournesparepairs.com.au
“Our trading terms are located on our website andMortrading terms shall form part of the contract which governs the relationship between you and us”.

Spa Maintenance

Spas need to be cared for and looked after like any other piece of machinery. At values between $4000 and $60,000 a spa shouldn’t be left alone to wait until something goes wrong. We recommend your spa be thouroughly inspected 6- monthly, with water checked monthly or weekly by someone truly qualified to understand YOUR spa’s chemical needs, as each spa is different and is operated differently. Cheat Sheets Available for Download: Lithium-based Spa Instructions | Bromine-based Spa Instructions | Peroxide-based Spa Instructions NEVER USE POOL CHLORINE (Dichloroisocyanuric Acid or Trichloroisocyanuric Acid). Damage *Will* Occur. Chemicals / Healthy water Due to the smaller body of water and less “splash out” compared to a normal swimming pool, spas are more likely to have an increased Total Dissolved Solid (TDS) present.  It’s therefore recommended to change spa water every three to four months, or replace about one-third of the volume every three to four weeks. Or at least bucket-swapped regularly. As the water is generally warm, the treatment guidelines for spa pool water in comparison to a pool are very different. Test the water before each use, or weekly when you’re not using the spa, and always wait one hour before using the spa after adding chemicals to the water. Regularly check total alkalinity, pH and sanitiser (PHMB, Chlorine or Bromine levels). The range of total alkalinity is recommended between 80ppm to 150ppm for effective sanitation. We only recommend Chlorine/Bromine-free alternative sanitizers if you or your family has sensitive skin or other skin conditions. There are many downfalls to chlorine-free alternatives. Testing pH The pH level measures acidity or alkalinity and is measured on a sale of 1 to 14, with 7.0 being neutral. Below 7.0 is acidic, and above is alkaline. Incorrect pH levels can cause poor Sanitiser efficiency, eye and skin irritations, corrosion of metal & plastic fittings, cloudy water and the formation of scale on the spa walls and fittings. Bromine is one of the worst for its affect on pH and is generally the cause of corroded jets and damaged heater elements. The recommended range for pH is 7.2 to 7.8. It can be increased by adding Alkalinity Increaser/Buffer, and reduced by adding pH reducer.  Always test again after one hour and for an accurate reading, at least once a month take a sample to your local Swimart store. Sanitising To ensure safe, healthy water which is free of harmful micro-organisms, sanitising your spa is essential.  The amount of sanitiser required depends on water temperature, how many people use the spa and how often.   In very hot water, the sanitiser can be used up very quickly, and should be checked regularly while the spa is being used. The most common forms of sanitiser for spas are Lithium, Chlorine and Bromine, Hydrogen Peroxide (Poppits). Ozone systems are commonly installed on spas and, depending on how they’re installed, provide an effective sanitation and oxidation effect.   However, because ozone leaves no residual, Australian Standards dictate other forms of sanitiser must be used in conjunction with it although generally at reduced amounts. Unfortunately Australian Standards do not apply to domestic pools & spas, so just about every “pool guy” or pool shop/chemical dealer will tell you different information. With our background in Commercial Pools & Spas, we always recommend you stick to Australian Standards. Ultra-Violet Radiation (UV) systems should be used in conjunction with Ozone and not on their own. They provide another step in sterilizations and also aid in the breakdown of combined chlorine (the smelly stuff at public pools). Both Ozone & UV systems should still be combined with another standard chemical sanitizer, but can drastically reduce the amounts of chemical sanitizers needed. Salt Water / Bromine Salt Water generators produce bromine or chlorine at consistent, small levels, so as to avoid the “shock” of adding alot of Chlorine/Bromine at a time. If you are using a salt water chlorinator, ensure it is designed and sized to produce the correct level of chlorine required to sanitise a spa. Silver/Copper Ionizers - these are another alternative sanitation system that can be very effective but again, we always recommend an additional standard chemical sanitizer in conjunction. Chemical dosage As discussed above, the amount of disinfectant required depends on water temperature and on how many people use the spa and how often. Keep in mind that very hot water (above 35 degrees) consumes the sanitiser very quickly, so make sure you check the level regularly when the spa is in use. After heavy use of the spa, the water should be shock dosed with Spa Shock/OxyShock/Peroxymonosulfate. Make sure you check the sanitiser level again before use. Even if you’re not using the spa or hot tub, we recommend maintaining an appropriate sanitiser and pH level to prevent contamination. People with Tinea, Chickenpox, or Gastro should avoid pools & spas until treated or healthy. Spas & Pools that have had exposure to bird feces should be treated appropriately before use. Normal Chlorine levels will not kill cryptosporidium. Pool Water Chemistry & Proper Sanitation can be very complex. Unlike typical Pool Shops & Pool “Technicians” we have a thorough knowledge of what is required for swimming pools & spas, and abide by Victorian Government Regulations. As A Guide, Current Health Regulations for Disinfection State: See Regulations for more information. Your equipment manufacturer may have differing requirements. Important Tips & Notes: Keep the temperature below 40 degrees (a range of 35 – 38 degrees is ideal) It’s important to keep the filter clean - clean the filter regularly and at least quarterly, soak your filter in Filter Degreaser. Store chemicals in a cool dry place out of the reach of children and animals Never mix chemicals together and never add water to chemicals, only add chemicals to water If your spa comes with a safety cover, ensure this is closed and locked when the spa is not in use Do not put your head under water in a spa. Spa suctions are a main cause of entrapment risk for hair and limbs Do not allow children in a spa without constant adult supervision Regularly check all suctions outlets are operating and suction covers are intact Understand the regulations and don’t necessarily trust a “pool guy,” Pool Shop, or “Pool Expert” to know what’s best for your particular system. As we said, there are no Regulations for domestic pool & spa chemical levels & filtration. Following what your pool guy said, is not necessarily the best way to go. We strongly discourage the use of Bromine due to its effect on pH & damage to equipment. We will not warrant any of our work where a spa uses Bromine, or where the pH has been shown to be low long-term. Have your spa checked 6-monthly by a licensed person, not a “pool guy.” Some Sources: http://www.health.vic.gov.au/water/aquatic- facilities/faqs.htm http://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/enterprise melbourne/industries/tourism/documents/po ol_handbook.pdf http://www.health.vic.gov.au/water/aquatic- facilities/index.htm http://www.legislation.vic.gov.au/ http://www.royallifesaving.com.au/aquatic- centres/managers/guidelines-for-safe- aquatic-venues/guidelines-for-safe-pool- operation http://www.gspo.com.au/